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fun of some religions and not others, and taxpayer dollars are paying for this shot at christianity. plus, the parents of the defendants-- the parents of the victim, and the prosecutor in charge of the case sharing powerful, powerful statements in sub steubenville, ohio as the judge finds the two teens guilty of rape. and a look the at the verdict and ask whether the punishment fits the crime. >> and the-- that needs to be taken-- (inaudible) an absolute disregard for another human being cannot go without punishment. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mort
. in fact, there's more than enough to go around." >>> a new poll from the public religion research institute this week shows that majorities in every faith group surveyed support an immigration policy that includes an earned pathway to citizenship. a little more than 60% of the population as a whole expressed the same attitude. nearly 70% of those surveyed said the golden rule, treating others as you'd like to be treated, is an important value in shaping immigration policy. >>> gordon cosby died this week. right after world war ii in which he was a paratrooper chaplain, he founded and then led the nondenominational church of the savior in washington, d.c. in an early interview on this program, cosby spoke of how members committed themselves totally to following jesus, beginning with tithes, prayers, meditation and study. >> then out of that, we feel, comes the capacity to do that which is important to be done in the society. >> the church of the savior divided into many small groups, ministering to the poor and sick. it developed a national influence, especially on young christians
're going to plant a tree? >> hal: no, i have to pick a religion to join so it will be science science sciencetolgy, or free may sons. we'll be back. >> and now here is something we hope you really like. noups it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ while your carpets may appear clean. it's scary how much dirt your vacuum can leave behind. add resolve deep clean powder before you vacuum to expel the dirt within your carpets. resolve's deep clean powder is moist. absorbing and lifting three times more dirt than vacuuming alone. leaving you with a carpet that's truly fresh and clean. don't just vacuum clean. resolve clean. the chill of peppermint. the rich dark chocolate. york peppermint pattie get the sensation. current tv is the place for true stories. with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines. real, gripping, current. documentaries... on current tv. ♪ >> hal: welcome back to the "stephanie miller show." that was -- that was an amazing yoda laugh from karl frisch. i was impressed. >> great. >> hal: it is always a grover laugh. >> slight variation.
: but gandhi was killed by someone of his own religion. >> hal: but that's no indication of the rest of the religion. the ku klux klan is basically a religious organization -- christian organization, but i'm not going to group that in with the rest. there will always be the extremists who believe -- in any group of people there will be your outliers who take what is said, what is spoken of in a group of people -- we agree the scientific method is a very important approach to dealing with things, and then other people will push that to ugenics, you can't save everybody so why should you try? but his whole point was and the route of the religion he was coming from -- and i wouldn't even limit it to hinduism i think it was a genuine human belief, that until we are peaceful with each other, we can never find a real path. and the way example is to live in a peaceful sense in spite of the fact that others might not live that way -- >> caller: i call these kind of talk shows because i do believe like gandhi said, jesus is wonderful, but the people who say they ar
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
're not the majori majority. we're a minority religion. therefore, this is a very different attitude toward the church than other catholic churches. we are not spain, not ireland even. we recognize all of the other religions have an equal right to their beliefs. that's why they're hesitant on the pro choice issue, even to obey their deepest moral beliefs. but i want to get back to, let me stick to that because the first thing the pope did was call the chief rabbi in rome and open up a relationship. these things, respecting people, it's universal. we americans can agree completely on these good things, and that would be nice because i think we have an american religion. i think we agree on a lot of these things together. and i know what you were feeling when you said you were inspired because there's a common hope that we can find a common morality. >> you're coming back. we'll tall politics, but up next, the debt dual in washington. is something going to get done this year, and would a balanced budget hurt the economy? joining me for debate, the republican wlip in the house, kevin mccarthy,
where no one cares what religion you are, the continuing sectarian violence, which the invasion and least 10 years ago, makes everyone depressed. she works as a waitress, something rare. she wants to get out, she says. there is no future in this country. except, there could be, thanks to iraq's future oil wealth. the last 10 years have seen hundreds of thousands of lives snuffed out or ruin, and more lives were lost today. more on where iraq stance 10 years on, i spoke a short time ago with president bush's envoy to iraq directly following the 2003 invasion. thanks very much for coming in. how will history look back on this war? >> it is, in a way, too early to ask. obviously, in 10 years, everybody says we need to have the answer, but i do not think we have it yet because it is a mixed record. there is good stuff and bad news. you have to find a balance, and it will take awhile. >> what could america have done to make it less of a mixed record and more of a good record? >> i have said all along that the transition from dictatorship to democracy is hard. it takes time, and the k
pains but good this, this is not about ideology anymore, i don't think it's about religion. when you look at the data, it's fundamentally about age. and not unlike a lot of the other shifts we've seen, it's a question of time for the conservatives and others who are locked in a different era because as we have seen so dramatically with senator portman, their own children raised in a conservative affirment are pushing back on them and their friends are pushing back on them and this is a matter of time. >> can i say one thing, lawrence? josh expressed this. the best thing for the republican party at this point would be for the supreme court to strike down prop 8 and doma so this becomes settled law of the land and they do not have to deal with the schism inside their party and all the old guys who are culturally or religiously or for whatever reason resistant to marriage equality will no longer be holding office and will die off, i think is what josh says, and the republican party can move past this. >> well, it would take a brave republican in the meantime to move against the party on
, freedom from religion, is protesting the memorial and several others, not because of the memorial itself, but they say because there's a cross on the memorial and that, they say, violates the separation of church and state and saying, i'm quoting here, our objection is to the message of endorsement of christianity over other religions and over non-religions. the christian-only memorial sends a message that the government only cares about the deaths of christian soldiers, not jewish, other non-christian and non-religious soldiers. coos bay says this. >> we passed it on to our city attorney to review that and relevant case law. and obviously these cases are happening around the nation. >> trace: again, it becomes a legal fight and the legal fights have been kind of split decisions. remember the cross of mount soledad? that had to be taken down. the mojave memorial was donated to a veterans group, but the supreme court ruled that that did not violate the establishment clause and they allowed that cross to stay. so somebody stole it a couple of years ago, so now it's gone. but legally, it wa
. great to see you. >> still to come, god and the gop. is turning away from a focus on religion the only answer of the gop to survive? plus, president obama's trip to israel hits a speed bump. the real reason his limo needed a tow today is next. >>> and there's a growing trend of super skyscrapers, i don't think is a better word to describe some of these guys, being built around the world. who's is biggest? bny mellon has the vision and experience to help. we look at the full picture... to uncover risk, find opportunities, and create a plan that's best suited for you. bny mellon. both of us actually. our pharmacist recommended it. and that makes me feel pretty good about it. and then i heard about a study looking at multivitamins and the long term health benefits. and what do you know? they used centrum silver in the study. makes me feel even better, that's what i take. sorry, we take. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. a hairline fracture to the mandible and contusions to the metacarpus. what do you see? um
. >>> still to come, god and the gop. is turning away from a focus on religion the only answer of the gop to survive? plus, president obama's trip to israel hits a speed bump. the real reason his limo needed a tow today is next. >>> and there's a growing trend of super skyscrapers, i don't think is a better word to describe some of these guys, being built around the world. who's is biggest? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and now i've got to take more pills. ♪ yup. another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? ♪ for my pain, i want my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] look for the easy-open red arthritis cap. [ female announcer ] from me
, with all of its suffering, but also all of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, judism, christianity and islam that trace their origins to abraham and see jerusalem as sake red. and it's a story that has inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our lands. to african americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a ome. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed o
on race or gender or sexual orientation or religion or national origin. but it can say for example we will operate this company more efficiently and give the shareholders a greater return on equity if we hire people within this range off, fill in the blanks, for blood pressure and weight because we are now forced to provide you with out care, this is i a more efficient class of people for whom to provide health care. can they do that, yes. dagen: don't you think they are asking for the ire of people around the country and accusations of discrimination in some way? >> not all discrimination is prohibited by law. the only discrimination is the basis by which we talked about. and we know those, gender, race, age, religion, etc. but on the base of health is not prohibited by law. with this exception. the americans for disability act prohibits discriminating against someone because they have an articulable disability. a physical disability, emotional or mental disability. high blood pressure or heavyweight is not immeasurable disability. connell: not taking care of yourself is not a disabi
? >> i don't know. old saying in the south it doesn't matter how you find religion as long as you do. i don't know if it is the dropping poll numbers or wants a leg icy and realizes you you can't have one without talking to republicans. either way it is a constructive thing. >> mike: i said you can't govern if you don't have relationships. >> right. >> mike: you can't have relationships if you don't look at each other face to face and spend time together. may not always be pleasant but it has got to be done. are you convinced and you were one of the senators that had dinner with him on the thursday night at the jefferson hotel. is he being a workhorse? or a showhorse? >> that is the ultimate the question. time will tell. he asked me to put the dinner on so i did. i picked some republicans that i thought would be interested in talking to the president. i know there are many more that would have been interested. we had a kind of limited number so i picked people i thought the president would like talking to. it was a great dinner. if he is going to be a workhorse that means he and his adm
celebrated the end of winter and now lint. religions, agan they consumed vast quantities of pancakes. more russians are embracing christianity. we get a report now. >> it's a time of prayer for russia's orthodox faithful. a preparation for lint, a holy eriod of abstinence. there are many churches shuttered. now the towns are pilgrimages for russia's increasingly spiritual society. >> newcomers found their place n life through the church. >> and it is also famous for its festival, a chance for everyone to feast, while others fast. >> the most important thing is, of course, is the spiritual development rather than simply dieting. people should go to church, rad read the bible, think about their sins, their soles -- souls and confess and with a clean soul you can break your fast. >> age old traditions attract the croused. some had come to watch. others to take part. >> we are very happy to be here. it's our all slavic land. we're going to different churches here and we wanted to be together for lint. together there is ritual strength. >> the festival calls for joy and laughter before the seri
extremism. city leaders say it is unfair to characterize an entire religion as violent. where was the city when the propalestinian group ran its own hateful ads. >> i think the san francisco official reaction to our ads is obscene and absurd. they wouldn't condemn the hateful statements on the air even when specifically asked to do so. they are only condemning me for drawing attention to those statements as if this problem will go away if we ignore it. >> because of previous first amendment court rulings they must roll the ad. >>> an early morning blaze is still under investigation tonight. this stubborn fire took hours to contain. the flames destroyed two homes. falling power lines made it hard for firefighters to bring the fire under control. >>> from berlin to mountain view a piece of world history is about to get a bigger platform. two large pieces of the berlin wall will soon be in front of the library. they are currently at an office park. there are portions of the wall on display in other parts of the country but this is the only one in the bay area. no word on when the slabs will b
for the next, massive killing in this country for us to get religion on this issue. senator feinstein, i was with her last night, and while she was very disappointed in what she heard from majority leader reed-mack, she was very clear about taking this to it's full and complete resolution. all of us have got to say to our colleagues in congress that fear is not an option. fear of not being read elected, we are paralyzed right now. we have to stop it. >> is there anything that congress can pass to curb the piling -- violence? there is nothing that can be done that would protect our children in the vast majority of america, do you agree with that? >> i refuse to believe that. i am hoping that we will pass some version of a repeal of a writer that has been attached to the appropriations bill. all of us are trying to work to repeal the amendment, which means that it would make it easier for law enforcement to conduct gun tracing efforts. right now they are preventing so many ways. i think there are some measures. uphill battle, but we have to ask the american people that this is a wake-up ca
to wait for the next massive killing in this country for us to get religion on this issue. senator feinstein, i was with her last night. and while she was very disappointed in what she heard from majority leader reid, she was very clear about taking this fight to its full and complete resolution. and i think all of us have got to say to our colleagues in congress that fear is not an option. fear of not being reelected, fear of the nra. we are fairlized in fear right now. and we've got to stop it. >> right. congresswoman lee, is there anything that congress can pass that will curb the violence? a lot of people have been pushing back saying look, there's nothing that could be done in washington, d.c. that would protect our children in the vast majority of america. do you agree with that? >> i refuse to believe that. i believe we can pass back ground checks. i'm hoping we'll pass some version of the repeal of the tee hard amendment. it's a rider. congressman moran, myself, all of us are trying to work to repeal the tiahrt amendment which would make it easier for law enforcement to con
to diminish any form of religion. the goal is to marginalize religious opposition to secular programs. >> well, o'reilly went on to say that they can tell children that those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary then that sets the stage for a totally secular society in the future. what the heck is a spring egg anyway? >> i don't know. you call the spring bunny little candy bunny the spring bunny and peeps. >> easter. >> anyway. okay. although easter is right around the corner. it sure doesn't feel like it. that is landing america's favorite groundhog in some hot water this morning. punxsutawney phil may be heading to court for predicting an early spring. it's true. phil the groundhog has been indicted in ohio for the misrepresentation of early spring. an ohio prosecutor says that phil was calculating and predicting spring despite snow and record cold temperatures that followed. >> i think need more to do that? >> okay. well, let's get your first degree weather update with maria molina. >> good morning. eye have a question are they going to start indicting meteorologists. >> you are are a law-a
of the jews and religion which was important for the rest of the world. >> sean: is that really so good? >> so for him to say that, it was a good things. and now, he wants the palestinians to recognize the jewish state. this is not going to happen. >> sean: i wanted to get your reaction? >> i spent a good amount of time in israel just over a month ago talking with their ministers and talking with the people. they are guarded. that is the only way i can say. they are guarded about american leadership and they understand our culture. we talk about the red line and who gives netanyahu the go ahead and does it meet the reality. net netted is going to have make the decisions he needs to make and he so get past that. get past the obama statements. get past the fact that we know that in 67 hamas was formed by the muslim brotherhood. he wants us to go back to '67 borders but it's not going to happen. >> the hamas charter still calls for the destruction -- >> look at the culture and look at the fact that they keep their people down so they can use them as ploys, if you will, to the world. the final thi
, for religion or whatever. if they miss use it the laws tell you if you violate the laws you should be punished. >> the laws have caught up with this technology. >> that is the issue we should be discussing, the technology that exists today, not the delivery system. >> our laws need to be as sophisticated as the people who are potentially breaking them. that is where we are headed. thank you very much. >> senator cruz. >> thank you, mr. chairman and will witnesses for testifying today. it seems to me drones are a technological pull. as with most schools can be used productively or can be abused. when we think about conduct overseas, in particular in counterterrorism, drones have proven an effective tool in certain circumstances and particularly have enabled us to deal with terrorists without placing service men and women directly in harm's way. at the same time it seems to me that oversees our conduct needs to be consistent with the laws of war. domestically in the united states, our conduct in all circumstances knees to be consistent with the constitution. and how that applies to drone surveil
people from every walks of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. of mentioned the aftermath the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? usas hoping you could give an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accele
. >> is that how you see it as well? it may cost the workplace or insurance companies or is it about religion? about core believes in that respect that is at the center piece of this argument. >> some argue that. some say this is a religious issue. as far as the federal courts have been concerned, they have looked strictly at the equal protection clause and looked at government action and whether or not it restricts personal freedom. that's the issue. there are friends of the court for religious organizations saying uphold the law, uphold the law. indeed there will be supporters of that. but at the end of the day, the court has to resolve whether or not personal freedoms are aff t affected by restricting 1,000 federal programs and laws that will be affected with the outcome if it's held unconstitutional. >> let's move on to proposition eight. it was passed by california voters in 2008 and amended the state constitution and took away marriage rights of same-sex couple s. now two couples are challenging that. how will this be argued that marriage of same-sex couples in a state that legalized i
of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, judaism, christianity. it's a story that's inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. to african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [ applause ] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world.
't matter how you find religion, as long as you do. i don't know if it's the drop in poll numbers or wants a legacy arealizes you can't have one without talking to republicans. either way it's a constructive thing. >> you can't govern if you don't have relationships and can't have relationships if you don't look at each other face-to-face and spend time together. may not always be pleasant, but it's got to be done and are you convinced-- you're one of the senators that had dinner with him thursday night at the hotel, is he being a work horse or a show horse? >> that's the ultimate question. time will tell. he asked me to put the dinner on, so, i did, i picked some republicans thought would be interested talking to the president. i know many more would have been interested. we're kind of limited number so i picked republicans i thought the president would enjoy talking to. if he's going to be a work horse he and his administration have to get in the room with the republicans to find a way to solve our budget problem. you can't do this campaigning, and i think he realizes being campaigner in
he said. "the vast majority of the world's 1.4 billion muslims adhere to a view of their religion that agrees on the need to impose sharia or islamic law on the world." he goes on to say that both the obama and even bush administration were too soft on islamists. does it disturb you that that comes from the mouth of once the top enforcement officer of this nation? >> well, yes, and it speaks to, you know, sort of the problem we're saying this report does not really get into policy. there's a reason they don't get into policy. if you get into policy, this is the sort of thing you have to say. >> how can he possibly make a claim like this about such a vast number of people? >> the entire tone from the right since 9/11 toward islam, toward muslims has been on par with this, roughly speaking. that's because it's sort of -- there was an appetite for that among the conservative base. and there's so much pressure in the party right now. it's a dysfunctional party in so many ways because there is so much pressure to conform to, you know, where the base is on a question like this. and if y
've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there getting religion and i've sort of lost sight what's going on in washington. give me an update of what i have missed. >> there's no white smoke coming out of the rnc building yet charlie i will tell you that. >> rose: what about the whitehouse. >> or the whitehouse. there's a great deal of ferment going on in the republican party right now which i think by and rge is healthy. there's a cole caveats now but the previous report on immigration i think a lot of things are happening. rand paul today came out for at least legal status for immigrants. so i think some people thought after this last election debalk backal will be pointing fingers and there's a lot of that going on. some of this stuff i think is productive for them now. putting a paper together the way actually doing some of this stuff. for instance it says we can't be a party of universal purity. yes we can all agree on that. it may be harder when they get to the caucuses. >> rose: are you watching or seeing each of the possible canned dates in 2016 stakin
obama. >> it does look very, very much -- >> i turned to my wife and said whoa. >> great religions, judaism, christianity and islam that seems jerusalem as -- the story of the exodus. >> if satan had a son, would he look like the guy? itches just as josh way carried on after moses. >> no one is calling him the devil. >> you can put it on your screen. >> is there something else i can do to mott make these guys paint horns on my head. >> angela rye. >> and dana milbank. angela, we just heard the president saying he wished republicans would stop -- and it seems the history channel has cast an actor in the role of satan that glenn beck and others say looks just like the president. i thought his greatest sin was being a kenyan socialist. now it appears he's satan as well? >> they just can't get enough. they tried to say he was born, he didn't wear a flag pin during the campaign, didn't say the pledge of allegiance. i do not united states these folks. i do not think at all this individual looks like the president. actually it looks burned, like he's been in the fire, hence satan, but not
of life, every background, every religion. and if they've got a good idea and willing to work hard, they can succeed. and that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about not just you know in the syria situation, but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise but also danger in the arab world in north africa. >> julie. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was also hoping you could give us some insight into how you brokered the call today between prime ministers and how much of their willingness to talk is actually driven by the urgency in syria. and, your majesty, you have offered assad asylum which he rejected, does that offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> well, i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremists because extremists thriv
of every walk of life. every background, every religion. if they've got a great idea and they're willing to work hard, they can succeed. that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syrian situation. but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise, but also danger in the arab world. and in north africa. julie pace? >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was hoping could give us insight on how you brokered the call between prime ministers erdogan and netenyahu and how much of their talk is driven by the urgency in syria. and your majesty, you've offered assad asylum, which he rejected. does the offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremism. because extremists thrive in chaos
by the public religion research institute finds almost two-thirds of all americans are in favor of a path to citizenship. though that number probably doesn't take into account the feelings of the 11 million undocumented americans. it also showed that 71% of americans favor a pathway and a robust 53% of republicans are in favor of one as well. which is all well and good. should we consider what immigrants think? we welcome the great writer who grew up in haiti and immigrated at age 12. she's written many beautiful novels and a book called create dangerously. the immigrant writer at work. she is a genius, certified. it is truly an honor to have you on the show. thank you very much. >> thank you so much for having me. i just remember you as such a novelist before. it has been great to see what's happened to you. >> now we're getting too much. your recent article, you talk about immigrants remain humane treatment. what do you mean? how do you define humane treatment? do you include a 13-year pathway as humane? >> well, humane treatment is basic. you have a detention system now where it is mos
a lot of metrics by silicon valley standards that people look for, ethnicity, religion, personality type. >> reporter: about you end up here, you go through boot camp. >> remost hove the hoodie. take it off right now. >> be on time. geeks are notorious for being late. >> it has been great. i met two people. one of them i was in a relationship with for a while. >> reporter: and amy boasts results. 45 couples in exclusive relationships and nearly 20 marriages. >> wow. nuptials too. lori, seems very pricey along the way. are singles, you know, really willing to pay that much for a date? clearly you have some that walked down the aisle, but in great volume, really? >> yeah, look, $20,000 for eight matches. it seems insane, but the idea is people are willing to pay this. i got on the phone with amy today, she said i'm seeing a boost because it is warming up and geeks want to come out of their caves, stop coding and meet people. the idea is time is money. they're building these companies. they have everything. they have a lot of money, but the one thing they don't have is love so they go to am
, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection w
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. say and bewould necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. , andhere is this conflict ons conflict is not resolved the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult
contextually means taking care of children. but this -- this is a sign, their religion is so often about signs and sim bog that he was able to have his inaugural mass on this day, that we have a ten-year anniversary of the iraq war coming out, that we have the anniversary of the march from selma to montgomery coming out, that these are opportunities that his leadership has begun during for him to weigh in and hear what his message is as it extends to the world. >> and let's recall during that homily the protection of creation that he talked about. this is one who took francis as his name, francis being a great creationist, praying brother, son, sister moon, and so this pope, i think, you will see a reach out, an outreach to ecology and protecting of the environment, much like benedict. >> looking at all the flags waving a moment ago in st. peter's square there. it is quite a scene. the vatican says 200,000 people, 150,000 to 200,000 people there. maybe a little bit on the lower end if you're doing crowd estimates right there. but jim bittermann is there and whatever the number is, there was ce
of freedom and religion and call on the iranian authorities to respect mr. abedini's human rights and to release him. you know, that is his statement. is that, what more do you want? what more do you expect? >> he made that statement the day he was confirmed but he wasn't secretary of state. since he has been secretary of state senator rubio's office has been following up with secretary kerry's office. he was responding to a question from senator rubio, a written question. here is another one of our points. the state department has never taken a proactive step. everything has been a reaction to a reporter's question, a senator's question. let's issue a statement from the secretary of state. martha: you played down this deadline here today of friday. what do you want by friday. >> we hope it comes before so we can work with the state department a clear statement from john kerry, secretary of state calling for eye saeed abedini's release and calling for iran to release this american citizen today. martha: i will leave everyone with this thought. you remember the hikers and all of th
with religion and so that's where we have the fundamental disagreement. >> which may be part of the problem. i think everybody should be able to be married civilly perhaps, but only some then have a religious ceremony. >> we'll take that. that's all we want. >> religious has a connotation. that's the distinction. >> if the catholic church says they support full civil rights, equal rights for same-sex partners, but they don't want it called marriage in the church, we'd take it. that would be fantastic. >> does it seem like that is exactly what he was doing? >> he hasn't said that publicly. perhaps said it privately. >> in the bishops conference meeting, he said it. >> it's a different prism that they are doing everything through. the prism through the archbishop of buenos aires is different than pope. >> and smaller group of people than the 1.2 billion throughout the world. >> i think we ultimately believe in separation of church and state and equal rights. i don't want a religious leader denying rights to people. >> i don't want to suggest that somehow i'm negative on it. if the new pope is wi
of the three great religions, judaism, christianity, and islam that trace their origins to abraham and see jerusalem as sacred. and it's a story that's inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. to african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom, expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth, we must bear our respo
or religion or cult the arrogance of their superiority reminds us that they do not give us right. we grant them power. they do not make us free. we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. the nra ad -- philip rucker, how effective is the nra message right now? guest: a message like that is effective with the base of the nra and many americans that live in some of these dates -- it's dates -- states. you play and add like that in ,est virginia, north carolina north dakota, and it resonates. it is a message about the elite in washington and san francisco, which is a reference to nancy pelosi, the democratic leaders in the house, and it is really trying to create these cultural divisions between decision- makers in washington and people back home who have guns and use them for sport. host: "political" tells us that nra fundraising is that the best in a decade. guest: the nra also reports that membership is growing, something the nra has been effective and skilled
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